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The 1st graders made hearts using oil pastels inspired by the work of Jim Dine.

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The 3rd graders made faces inspired by modern artist Kimmy Cantrell. They used slabs of clay to cut out the face shape and the excess for facial features and details. After they were fired they finished them by coloring them with oil pastels and painting over that with a black wash. They sealed them with a clear varnish. They worked hard and it shows!

 

 

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Great Resource for Pop Art Lesson.

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Great Resource of High School Art Lessons.

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Resource for Elementary Lessons. This was a Keith Haring project they did in their cafeteria.

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Great Resource for Elementary Lessons.

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This is a great elementary resource. This project was over the color wheel; primary and secondary colors for 1st graders.

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This is a really awesome art website for examples of high school art projects. It is very inspirational. The teacher has it categorized by the level and the media.

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Teacher’s Name: Andrew Farmer & Lindsey Besser

Grade Level: 6 – 9th grade

Course Name: Game Design

 

Lesson/Unit Goal(s): Students will learn effective communication skills while building a team Avatar.

Lesson Date: 6/12/2012

Lesson/Unit Title: Game Design

Estimated Length of Lesson: 10 – 12 min.

 Standard 9: The student who contributes positively to the learning community and to society is information literate and participates effectively in groups to pursue and generate information.

 

Benchmark 2: The student respects other’s ideas and backgrounds and acknowledges their contributions.

 

Indicator: The student encourages consideration of ideas and information from all group members.

 

Specific Anticipated Learner Outcomes (Objectives): Students will construct an avatar. Students will apply effective communication skills.

Essential Question(s): How could you have communicated more effectively to decide on an avatar?

Guarded Vocabulary: Avatar/sprite, environment, characteristics, communicate, cooperation.

Assessment Strategies and Criteria:

Checklist Rubric: Timing (5min), Following Directions, Team Cooperation, Creativity, Presentation.

 

Classroom Set Up: Students will stand with their pre-assigned group members next to a large piece of paper hanging on the wall. After the initial activity is completed they will sit in their groups of four, until they are asked to reassemble at their poster. All other students’ desks will be facing the students who are presenting.

 

Resources and Sources: Checklist rubric, Scratch program, poster paper, markers, and score sheet.

**Learning Activities – Applying REACT

Relate – Example of Real World Connections or Discussion of Preconceptions: During the introduction and wrap up we will discuss how characters are designed for video games. Group cooperation and creativity will be emphasized.

 

Experience-Activity or procedure for experiencing the skill or standard: Teams will work together respectfully to generate an avatar character created from each members contribution.
Apply – Activity or procedure for using the skill or standard: As a group of 3-4, students will collaborate to create a completely unique avatar (sprite or mascot). Student will take all ideas and input into account before coming up with an idea as a team. Keeping in mind all pre-discussed information about designing a character/sprite for a game, (environment, clothing, colors, moves, and skills). They will then work together to transfer the idea they have generated onto their poster.

 

Cooperate – How students will interact: Students will cooperate with their 2-3 team members throughout this 10-15 minute activity. It will be discussed that if they don’t work together they won’t receive all available points. Not working as a team includes, but is not limited to: students sitting out, one or two students taking over, putting other classmates down, arguments or fights that aren’t resolved, and poor sportsmanship.

 

Identify Transfer of Learning Strategy (wrap-up or new or unique situation application): To wrap-up this activity we will discuss with students these questions:

  • What decisions did they have to make as a group?
  • Did problems arise? If so, how were they resolved?
  • What factors did your team have to consider when creating your “sprite or avatar”? (Environment, colors, or characteristics?)
  • Was everyone’s opinions taken into account?
Teacher’s Name: Andrew Farmer & Lindsey Besser

Grade Level: 6-9th grade

Course Name: Game Design

 

Lesson/Unit Goal(s): Students recognize key characteristics of the three games played in class.

Lesson Date: 6/18/2012

Lesson/Unit Title: Game Design

Estimated Length of Lesson:15-20 min

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

STANDARD 5: The student will demonstrate abilities of technological design and understandings

about science and technology.

Benchmark 1: The student will demonstrate abilities of technological design.

Indicators:

The student…

1. identifies appropriate problems for technological design, designs a solution or product, implements the proposed design, evaluates the product, and communicates the process of technological design.

 

Specific Anticipated Learner Outcomes (Objectives): Students will evaluate one of the three games decided on as a team.

Essential Question(s): Based on what you know about games, what makes these games successful?

Guarded Vocabulary: characteristics, characters, outline, graphic organizer, sprite

Assessment Strategies and Criteria: Students will individually fill out graphic organizers based on the chosen game. Students will then discuss what was good about the game and what they didn’t like with their individual group as well as the whole class.

 

 

Classroom Set Up: Desks will be arranged around the room in groups of 3-4, so they can discuss their games at the end of the activity.

Resources and Sources: The three games: Portal, Nascar, and Street Chicken; graphic organizers, pencils.

 

**Learning Activities – Applying REACT

Relate – Example of Real World Connections or Discussion of Preconceptions: Students will play three different games; Portal on the Playstation3, Nascar on X-Box360, and Street Chicken online. They will then evaluate how to play these games and what made them successful or unsuccessful.

 

Experience-Activity or procedure for experiencing the skill or standard: After students play the game they will divide into their groups. Each team member will be given a different worksheet. They will then evaluate the game; one is on storyboard, second is on character design (sprites), thirds is on game scripts like: mechanics, movements and rules, and the last is on the world or level design.
Apply – Activity or procedure for using the skill or standard: The students will fill out the graphic organizers and evaluate the mechanics of the game. Then the students determine the actual concepts of the game that they would like to apply to the game they will be designing.

 

Cooperate – How students will interact: Students will work together, in their groups, and discuss the mechanics of the game and what made it successful. They will come up with important aspect to share with the class.

 

Identify Transfer of Learning Strategy (wrap-up or new or unique situation application): As a class we will wrap up the activity by discussing each game that was played. We will go around and have each group tell us what they thought was a positive and negative aspect of the game. Questions that could be asked to get the students talking:

  • What was one aspect of the game that made it successful? Why?
  • Which parts of the game are you going to include in your game and why?
  • Which characteristic don’t you want in your own game design?
  • Are there any game ideas, already in your heads, based on the games we have played so far, or a game you’ve played before?
  • What are some types of games we could make?
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MEDIA: Crayons and Black Tempera Paint

OBJECTIVES:

The student will…

-Discuss/Critique Landscape with Yellow Birds by Paul Klee

-Observe demonstration on wax-resist technique

-Apply wax-resist technique on their landscape drawing

ASSESSMENT: (Must measure the objectives listed…how will you know if learning took place?)

Checklist:

-Student created landscape drawing

-Student applied wax-resist technique

-Student cleaned up supplies at table

MATERIALS AND RESOURCES:

Landscape with Yellow Birds by Paul Klee

Examples

8 ½ x 11’’ white papers

Crayons

Black tempera paint

Paintbrushes

Sponges

VOCABULARY:

Landscape

Wax-Resist

Paul Klee

PROCEDURE:

  • Prior knowledge (What do they already know):

Students will know what is in a landscape picture. They will also know how to draw their own landscape picture.

  • Motivation (What you do to motivate them):

I will start by showing the students the artwork by Paul Klee. We will discuss this and then they will see my example. A new technique will be interesting for them to learn.

  • Demonstration of technique (Show them how):

We will start by discussing/brainstorming objects that could go into their landscape pictures as I draw an example on the overhead, emphasizing coloring until it is “waxy.” Then I will show them the fun process to antique their work and start on the wax resist: applying black tempera paint to the entire surface of their drawings then using a wet sponge to carefully wipe of in the areas where the wax resists the paint.

  • Instructions to students (What do you want them to do when you’re done  demonstrating?):

Students will be asked to retrieve desk protectors and the crayon baskets. They will be receiving a piece of white paper. They will start to draw their landscape. When they are finished they can show the teacher and then retrieve supplies for painting on the tempera.

  • Culminating experience (What happens to wrap up the lesson?):

To wrap up the lesson students will place work in drawer if still drawing or on the drying rack if wax-resist applied to work. They will be asked to clean up their tables and put away table protectors and crayon baskets. Quiet tables will line up.

 

Paul Klee: Landscape with Yellow Birds

 

He was Expressionist painter- What do you think Expressionist means?

Emotions- What does this painting make you feel?

What else do you notice?

Landscape

- What is a landscape?

- What can you find in a landscape?

- What kinds of landscapes could you create?

Assignment:

-To create a landscape that expresses a place or feeling.

-It will probably be an important place to you.

Demo:

-My landscape will be at the lake

-What kinds of things would you see at the lake? (emphasize coloring to make it waxy)

-When finished you will apply a technique to your crayon drawing. It’s called wax-resist. We will paint over our entire drawing with black paint. Where you have drawn with crayon the paint won’t stick or stay. It will resist the paint. Using a wet sponge you will wipe away the paint from the areas with crayon wax underneath. You must be careful because if you rub too hard it will rip the paper.

 

Examples of student work: